The stats are in and more than half of American adults say they’re addicted to their digital devices, going cold turkey is not an option for most freelancers. This is an excellent article that gives you five helpful tips to help curb your social media addiction.

For those who wish to take a step back from social media, the effects of overuse are all too clear. But the solution remains elusive, especially for those whose jobs require them to be frequently, if not constantly, connected. We spoke with five social media and behavioral experts to get their tips on how you can kick your most pernicious social media habits if cutting yourself off completely isn’t an option.

1. Set boundaries, and stay mindful of them

Consider approaching your social media use as you would approach a diet, says Kat Glick, the director of quality and compliance at Talkspace, an online therapy platform where she also counsels clients. “Start small, and define which aspects of social media are a problem,” she says. If social media wastes your time, set a daily limit, or confine your use to a certain time of day. Likewise, if it limits your engagement in other important activities–family time, business meetings, or social events–try keeping your phone in another room. A social media-blocking app can help, but self-correction is best. “Mindfulness is key to any behavioral modification,” Glick says . When you notice you want to check Facebook, slow down and consider why. If it’s just boredom, find another way to entertain yourself.

2. Have someone else keep you accountable

In the Berry household, the best strategy is teamwork. Given the global nature of the Berrys’ businesses, conventional work hours don’t exist, so having a cut-off time for answering emails and addressing social media notifications has been an important step toward finding a healthy level of use. “My wife and I have a pact to try and catch each other when we’re overusing,” says Paul. When one or the other is doing so, all it takes is a reminder to put the phone down.

Read the rest of the article here: Inc.com